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توجه ! این یک نسخه آرشیو شده میباشد و در این حالت شما عکسی را مشاهده نمیکنید برای مشاهده کامل متن و عکسها بر روی لینک مقابل کلیک کنید : جدید ترین گالری های جهان



Mehraz
28.06.2011, 00:55
Serpentine Gallery Pavilion by Jean Nouvel






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Here are the first official photos of the 10th Serpentine Gallery Pavilion in Kensington Gardens, London, designed by French architect Jean Nouvel.
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The geometric structure combines lightweight translucent facade materials, retractable awnings and a 12 metre cantilevered wall.
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The striking red colour of the pavilion contrasts with the surrounding park and refers to iconic symbols of London.
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An auditorium will host the Park Nights programme of public talks and events and also a public café.
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The temporary structure is the first building to be completed in the UK by Nouvel.

Mehraz
28.06.2011, 00:56
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The pavilion opens to the public this Saturday the 10th and remains open until 17 October.
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Photographs are by Philippe Ruault.
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See our previous story about this year’s pavilion here.
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Mehraz
28.06.2011, 00:58
10th Serpentine Gallery Pavilion Designed by Jean Nouvel 10 July – 17 October 2010 In 2010 the Serpentine Gallery celebrates its 40th anniversary. This year the Serpentine Gallery Pavilion is designed by world-renowned French architect Jean Nouvel. This is the 10th commission in the Gallery’s annual architectural series, the world’s first and most ambitious programme of its kind. It will be the architect’s first completed building in the UK.
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The Pavilion commission has become an international site for architectural experimentation and follows a long tradition of Pavilions by some of the world’s greatest architects. The immediacy of the commission – a maximum of six months from invitation to completion – provides a unique model worldwide.
The design for the 2010 Pavilion is a contrast of lightweight materials and dramatic metal cantilevered structures. The entire design is rendered in a vivid red that, in a play of opposites, contrasts with the green of its park setting. The colour reflects the iconic British images of traditional telephone boxes, post boxes and London buses.
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The building consists of bold geometric forms, large retractable awnings and a freestanding wall that climbs 12m above the lawn, sloping at a gravity defying angle. Striking glass, polycarbonate and fabric structures create a versatile system of interior and exterior spaces.
Around the Pavilion, Nouvel has created spaces for outdoor enjoyment and play, bringing the tradition of French civic parks to London. Red table tennis tables, draughts, chess, frisbees and kites will be available for the public to play with throughout the summer months.
The flexible auditorium will accommodate the Serpentine Gallery café and the Gallery’s Park Nights programme which culminates in the 5th Serpentine Gallery Marathon: The Marathon of Maps for the 21 Century on 16 and 17 October.
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Maps have a powerful hold on our imaginations, defining our understanding of geography, scale, space and ideas. Artists, writers, thinkers and scientists will present maps encompassing their experience of the world today.
Jean Nouvel is responsible for the design of over 200 buildings the world over, including the Copenhagen Concert Hall (2009); the Ferrari Factory, Modena (2009); Pavilion B at the Genoa Trade Fair (2009); 40 Mercer Street, NewYork (2008); the Musée du quai Branly, Paris (2006); the extension to the Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofía, Madrid (2006); the Guthrie Theater, Minneapolis (2001); the Torre Agbar, Barcelona (2000); the Culture and Congress Centre, Lucerne (2000), and the Institut du Monde Arabe, Paris (1989).
Nouvel’s body of work is unparalleled in its innovation and range. His approach is characterised by a conceptual rigour, rather than by an overarching aesthetic. He emphasises research, analysis and discussion, creating designs that are highly individual to each project. A key part of Nouvel’s process is his embrace of other disciplines, including music, literature and the moving image.
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Mehraz
28.06.2011, 01:13
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Here are the first official photographs of the completed 2011 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion, which was unveiled today by Swiss architect Peter Zumthor.
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A planted garden by Dutch designer Piet Oudolf is enclosed at the heart of the black-painted pavilion, filled with flowers and shrubs.
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This inner garden is surrounded by a blue bench under a canopy that projects inwards from the walls.
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The pavilion is a timber framed structure covered in gauze and painted over with a black adhesive.
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A narrow corridor circulates the perimeter of the building between the facade and the garden.

Mehraz
28.06.2011, 01:13
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The pavilion opens to the public this Friday the 1 July and remains open until 16 October.
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It is the first building to be completed in the UK by Zumthor and will be followed next year by The Secular Retreat in Devon for Alain de Botton’s Living Architecture project.
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See more stories about the Serpentine Gallery pavilions »
See all of our stories about Peter Zumthor »
Photography is by Walter Herfst.
Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2011
Designed by Peter Zumthor
1 July – 16 October 2011
The Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2011 is designed by world-renowned Swiss architect Peter Zumthor. This year’s Pavilion is the 11th commission in the Gallery’s annual series, the world’s first and most ambitious architectural programme of its kind. It is the architect’s first completed building in the UK and includes a specially created garden by the influential Dutch designer Piet Oudolf.

At the heart of Peter Zumthor’s Pavilion is a garden that the architect hopes will inspire visitors to become observers. Zumthor says his design ‘aims to help its audience take the time to relax, to observe and then, perhaps, start to talk again – maybe not.’ The design emphasises the role the senses and emotions play in our experience of architecture. With a refined selection of materials Zumthor creates contemplative spaces that evoke the spiritual dimension of our physical environment. As always, Zumthor’s aesthetic goal is to customise the building precisely to its purpose as a physical body and an object of emotional experience. Zumthor has stated that ‘the concept for this year’s Pavilion is the hortus conclusus, a contemplative room, a garden within a garden. The building acts as a stage, a backdrop for the interior garden of flowers and light. Through blackness and shadow one enters the building from the lawn and begins the transition into the central garden, a place abstracted from the world of noise and traffic and the smells of London – an interior space within which to sit, to walk, to observe the flowers. This experience will be intense and memorable, as will the materials themselves – full of memory and time.’

Materials have always played an evocative as well as an essential role in the buildings designed by Zumthor. The 2011 Pavilion is constructed of a lightweight timber frame wrapped with scrim and coated with a black Idenden over scrim. Exterior and interior walls with staggered doorways offer multiple paths for visitors to follow, gently guiding them to a central, hidden inner garden. The covered walkways and seating surrounding this central space create a serene, contemplative environment from which visitors look onto the richly planted sunlit garden, the heart and focus of the building.

With this Pavilion, as with previous structures such as the famous Thermal Baths at Vals, Switzerland, or the Bruder Klaus Chapel in Mechernich, Germany, Zumthor has emphasised the sensory and spiritual aspects of the architectural experience, from the precise yet simple composition and ‘presence’ of the materials, to the handling of scale and the effect of light. Piet Oudolf is a prominent garden designer and a leading figure of the New Perennial planting movement. His award-winning designs emphasise the natural architecture of plants, using expressive drifts of grasses and herbaceous perennials to create gardens that evolve in form throughout the lives of the plants. These are chosen for their structure, form, texture and colour, showcasing many different varieties in his compositions. Oudolf has pioneered an approach to gardening that embraces the full life-cycle of plants, delighting in their beauty throughout the seasons.

Piet Oudolf said: “I am very pleased to be collaborating with Peter Zumthor and the Serpentine Gallery on this year’s Pavilion and to be part of this exciting project. My work aims to bring nature back into human surroundings and this Pavilion provides the perfect opportunity for people to reflect and relax in a contemplative garden away from the busy metropolis.”

The Serpentine’s Pavilion commission, conceived in 2000 by Gallery Director Julia PeytonJones, has become an international site for architectural experimentation and follows a decade of Pavilions by some of the world’s greatest architects. Each Pavilion is sited on the Gallery’s lawn for three months and the immediacy of the commission – a maximum of six months from invitation to completion – provides a unique model worldwide.

Julia Peyton-Jones, Director, and Hans Ulrich Obrist, Co-Director, Serpentine Gallery, said: “It is an honour and a great joy to be working with Peter Zumthor on the 11th Serpentine Gallery Pavilion. The commission allows us to connect with the best architects in the world and each year is an exciting and completely new experience. Zumthor’s plans will realise an exquisite space for the public to enjoy throughout the summer.”

Zumthor’s Serpentine Gallery Pavilion will operate as a public space and as a venue for Park Nights, the Gallery’s high-profile programme of public talks and events. Park Nights will culminate in the annual Serpentine Gallery Marathon in October, now in its sixth year. In 2006 the Park Nights programme included the renowned 24-hour Serpentine Gallery Interview Marathon, convened by Hans Ulrich Obrist and architect Rem Koolhaas; in 2007, the Serpentine Gallery Experiment Marathon presented by artist Olafur Eliasson and Hans Ulrich Obrist; in 2008, Obrist led over 60 participants in the Serpentine Gallery Manifesto Marathon. These were followed in 2009 by the Serpentine Gallery Poetry Marathon and in 2010 by the Serpentine Gallery Map Marathon.

Mehraz
28.06.2011, 01:17
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Here are the first official photos of this year’s Serpentine Gallery Pavilion in Kensington Gardens, London, designed by Japanese designers SANAA.

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The surrounding park is reflected in the temporary structure’s aluminium roof, which is shaped to curve around trees on the site and varies in height.

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Curved walls made of transparent acrylic surround a cafe and auditorium under this canopy. The pavilion opens to the public on Sunday and will remain in place until 18 October. Photographs are by Luke Hayes.

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A program of events called Park Nights will be hosted in the auditorium including performances, talks and screenings, and culminating in the Serpentine Gallery Poetry Marathon in October.

Mehraz
28.06.2011, 01:19
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The 2009 Serpentine Gallery Pavilion designed by Japanese designers SANAA opens to the public in London tomorrow. Here we present a quick guide to all the Serpentine Gallery Pavilions (including the 2003 incarnation, above, by Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer) since the series was inaugurated in 2000.

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In 2000, Zaha Hadid was the first architect invited to design a temporary summer pavilion for the lawns in front of the Serpentine Gallery in Kensington Gardens, London. Her design was a fabric-clad, triangulated steel frame structure (above). See all our stories about Zaha Hadid.

Each year since then, the gallery has invited a leading international architect who has not built in England before to design a pavilion. Photo © 2007 Dafydd Jones. Top image Photo © 2007 Richard Bryant.

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In 2001, Daniel Libeskind presented Eighteen Turns (above), a series of aluminium panels with folds that made reference to origami. Photo © 2007 Hélène Binet

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Japanese architect Toyo Ito’s 2002 pavilion used a random pattern of triangles and trapezoids that was derived from the algorithm of a cube that expanded as it rotated. Photo © 2007 Deborah Bullen.

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The Serpentine Gallery Pavilion 2003 (above) by Brazilian architect Oscar Niemeyer was made from steel, aluminium, concrete and glass, with a red ramp and partly submerged auditorium. Photo © 2007 Richard Bryant

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The series skipped a year in 2004, as the proposed design by Dutch architects MVRDV (above) proved too complex to build.

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In 2005, Portuguese architects Álvaro Siza and Eduardo Souto de Moura teamed up with engineer Cecil Balmond of Arup, producing a design based on a distorted rectangular grid and constructed from a series of interlocking timber beams. Photo © 2007 Richard Bryant/arcaid.co.uk

Mehraz
28.06.2011, 01:19
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Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas teamed up with engineer Cecil Balmond of Arup to design the 2006 pavilion (above). A translucent circular space was topped with a giant balloon that could be raised and lowered according to the weather. See all our stories about Rem Koolhaas. Photo © John Offenbach

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In 2007 there were two pavilions. Zaha Hadid returned with an installation of three fabric-claed forms called Lilas (above). More info and images in our story from 2007. See all our stories about Zaha Hadid.

Lilas was commissioned to host the Serpentine’s annual summer party due to construction delays on the pavilion proper, designed by artist Olafur Eliasson and architect Kjetil Thorsen of Snøhetta (below). Above photograph © Luke Hayes

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Opening a little late for the summer party, the spinning top-shaped 2007 pavilion was designed by artist Olafur Eliasson and Norwegian architect Kjetil Thorsen, of the architectural practice Snøhetta. More info and images in our story from 2007. Photograph © 2007 Luke Hayes

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The 2008 pavilion (above) was designed by architect Frank Gehry. It consisted of four timber-clad steel columns, large timber planks and overlapping glass planes. More info and images in our story from last year. Photo © Iwan Baan

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This year’s pavilion (above) is designed by Japanese duo Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa of SANAA. It is made of aluminium faced plywood floating on a series of thin stainless steel columns